Concise, critical reviews of books, exhibitions, and projects in all areas and periods of art history and visual studies

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Asma Naeem
Oakland: University of California Press, 2020. 248 pp.; 49 color ills.; 27 b/w ills. Cloth (9780520298989)

Asma Naeem’s book starts with one of those “aha” moments that occur when, as an art historian, you recognize that you have been overlooking a simple but persistent phenomenon relevant to your subject. Vision, it turns out, is not the only sense relevant to the field—hearing matters too. Naeem’s first sentence will not surprise most art historians: “Museums weren’t always the hallowed spaces of reflection that they are today” (1). However, she builds on this straightforward observation to... Full Review

February 24, 2020
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Carol Armstrong
New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2018. 296 pp.; 108 color ills.; 18 b/w ills. Cloth $65.00 (9780300232714)

Virginia Woolf recalled seeing a small Cézanne still life of apples at the home of John Maynard Keynes, as Carol Armstrong recounts in Cézanne’s Gravity. “What can 6 apples not be? I began to wonder. There’s their relationship to each other, & their colour, & their solidity” (34). It was a dozen years after Paul Cézanne’s death, but the spirit of the painter was very much alive among the Bloomsbury circle of artists and intellectuals viewing the work. The assembled... Full Review

February 21, 2020
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Kathleen Giles Arthur
Visual and Material Culture, 1300–1700. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2018. 252 pp. Cloth $120.00 (9789462984332)

Kathleen Giles Arthur’s concise study illuminates the intersection of visual culture and the spiritual lives of Observant Franciscan women in fifteenth-century Ferrara, Italy. Her book is an outstanding and much-needed contribution to scholarship on art and the Poor Clares.

Historians of this topic have focused primarily on the visionary treatise Le sette armi spirituali, written by Caterina Vigri (1413–1463), founder of the convent now usually known as Corpus Domini in... Full Review

February 19, 2020
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Sam Rose
University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2019. 224 pp.; 27 b/w ills. Cloth $89.95 (9780271082387)

In Art and Form: From Roger Fry to Global Modernism, Sam Rose contends with the discursive legacy of “formalist modernism,” a narrative contaminated by perpetuating misunderstandings. According to Rose, “formalist modernism” constitutes a narrow view that cleaves internal form from external meaning, separating art from life. Formalism itself, as an intellectual category, has suffered the same reductivist fate that it purports to drive in the orthodox trajectory of modern art, from... Full Review

February 10, 2020
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Anthony W. Lee
McGill/Beaverbrook Canadian Foundation Studies in Art History 26. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019. 344 pp.; 193 color ills. Cloth $55.00 (9780773557130)

The history of photography has long been written along geographic boundaries. Until recently nation-based narratives, especially those of Great Britain, France, and the United States, dominated the field, and when new studies representing long-neglected corners of the world appeared, they tended to replicate the well-established examples that preceded them. Within the past decade, however, scholars have begun to shift emphasis from individual photographers and nations to the circulation of... Full Review

February 7, 2020
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Marcia Kupfer
London: Yale University Press in association with Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2016. 240 pp.; 50 color ills.; 50 b/w ills. Cloth $75.00 (9780300220339)

This book offers readers an in-depth study of one single object: the world map (mappa mundi) produced for Hereford Cathedral in England around 1300 CE. Rather than situating this work within the history of cartography, Marcia Kupfer treats it as an object of art. She convincingly argues that by exclusively considering the map as a repository of geographical knowledge, scholars have fundamentally misunderstood the mappa mundi and some of its puzzling visual characteristics.... Full Review

February 5, 2020
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Marisa Anne Bass
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2019. 312 pp.; 192 color ills. Cloth $65.00 (9780691177151)

Art is autobiography in the nostalgic mode. This is the main lesson of Marisa Anne Bass’s Insect Artifice: Nature and Art in the Dutch Revolt. This learned and refined book examines the life and works of Joris Hoefnagel (1542–1601), the troubled Netherlandish artist who was forced to leave the Low Countries in the wake of the Dutch Revolt and spent his later years at the Bavarian court of Duke Albrecht V and then in Rudolf II’s Prague. In Bass’s telling, the determining event of... Full Review

February 3, 2020
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Sam Rose
University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2019. 224 pp.; 27 b/w ills. Cloth $89.95 (9780271082387)

In Art and Form: From Roger Fry to Global Modernism, Sam Rose revisits British writing on art over the first four decades of the twentieth century so as to determine what can be retrieved from its formalisms. Rose asks in what way art historical formalisms can be made productive for today’s renewed interest in aesthetics and in light of an urgent, more inclusive turn in the discipline from Western modernism to global modernisms. The answer, in a nutshell, is a “more modest”... Full Review

January 31, 2020
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Andrew James Hamilton
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2018. 304 pp.; 105 color ills.; 55 b/w ills. Cloth $65.00 (9780691172736)

This beautifully produced and illustrated book joins a growing shelf of studies devoted in whole or in substantial part to phenomena of scale in world arts and visual and material cultures, including David Summers’s Real Spaces (Phaidon, 2003), a special issue of the journal Art History (38, no. 2; April 2015) edited by Joan Kee and Emanuele Lugli, Lugli’s own recent book The Making of Measure and the Promise of Sameness (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Darcy... Full Review

January 29, 2020
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Raphaela Platow and Lowery Stokes Sims, eds.
Exh. cat. New York: Rizzoli Electa, 2019. 252 pp.; 130 color ills. Cloth $66.00 (9780847866953)
Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, September 20, 2019–January 12, 2020; Portland Art Museum, Oregon, February 15–May 17, 2020; Chicago Cultural Center, June 20–September 27, 2020; Akron Art Museum, Ohio, October 25, 2020–January 31, 2021; Sarasota Museum of Art, Florida, March–June 2021

The press release for the US Pavilion at the 1997 Venice Biennale described Robert Colescott (1925–2009) as “arguably the most important American figurative painter of his generation.” The qualifier, “arguably,” is significant, because since the 1990s few scholars have been making that argument. A lifelong teacher, Colescott didn’t begin to make a name for himself until 1971, at the age of forty-six, with outrageous, satirical paintings about race, sexuality, and power in art history and... Full Review

January 23, 2020
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