Concise, critical reviews of books, exhibitions, and projects in all areas and periods of art history and visual studies

Reviews in caa.reviews are published continuously by CAA and Taylor & Francis, with the most recently published reviews listed below. Browse reviews based on geographic region, period or cultural sphere, or specialty (from 1998 to the present) using Review Categories in the sidebar, or by entering terms in the search bar above.

Recently Published Reviews

Marije Osnabrugge
Amsterdam Studies in the Dutch Golden Age. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2019. 400 pp.; 20 color ills.; 89 b/w ills. Cloth €129.00 (9789462988200)

For a few decades now, immigration has been at the center of societal debates and political programs, at least in the Global North. Migrant artists are rarely mentioned in these discussions, perhaps because professional artists make up a relatively negligible segment of the total immigrant population. Conversely, however, it seems likely that nowadays a high percentage of those making a living by making art are migrants; the same goes for art historians. Marije Osnabrugge, the... Full Review

March 27, 2020
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Charlotte Guichard
Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 2018. 368 pp.; 98 color ills. Cloth €31.00 (9782021402315)

In La griffe du peintre, Charlotte Guichard offers a reflection on the painter’s signature in France during the long eighteenth century, both as a sign of artistic identity and as a bearer of value. She convincingly argues that the topic is best served by anchoring analysis at the intersection of various perspectives, simultaneously tracing a “material history of easel painting and a cultural history of signature” (25; all translations are my own). Together, these approaches... Full Review

March 25, 2020
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Ünver Rüstem
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2019. 336 pp.; 204 color ills.; 44 b/w ills. Cloth $65.00 (9780691181875)

In this extensive study on eighteenth-century Ottoman Istanbul, Ünver Rüstem examines the evolution of baroque architecture under the patronage of five consecutive sultans, from Ahmed III (r. 1703–30) to Abdülhamid I (r. 1774–89), concluding with the significance of building activity during the reign of Sultan Selim Full Review

March 24, 2020
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Baltimore Museum of Art, September 29, 2019–January 19, 2020
Baltimore Museum of Art, September 29, 2019–January 12, 2020
Baltimore Museum of Art, July 14, 2019–January 5, 2020

Three recent exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) reflected an important shift in priorities for that institution. The first and largest, Generations: A History of... Full Review

March 20, 2020
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Denise Markonish, ed.
Exh. cat. North Adams, MA and New York: MASS MoCA in association with DelMonico Books-Prestel, 2017. 200 pp.; 133 color ills. Cloth $49.95 (9783791356051)
MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA, October 15, 2016–September 4, 2017; Tramway, Glasgow, August 3–November 11, 2019; Carriageworks, Sydney, November 23–March 3, 2019; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR, July 18, 2020–January 3, 2021

The initial sensation on entering Nick Cave’s installation Until is one of beguilement. Thousands of brightly colored wind spinners—metal discs cut with concentric designs that generate a holographic effect when in motion—hang on wire strands from ceiling to floor in a glittering thicket. The walls are netted with pony beads threaded into vivid designs: the word “power,” a hashtag, a red World Full Review

March 18, 2020
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Dread Scott
2019.
New Orleans, November 8–9, 2019

“Slave rebellions were a continuous source of fear in the American South, especially since black slaves accounted for more than one-third of the region’s population in the 18th century.” So begins the most current article on slave rebellions on the History network website. The writers can imagine a fear of rebellion but not the hopes embodied therein; they traffic... Full Review

March 17, 2020
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Erin O'Toole, ed.
Exh. cat. London: MACK, 2019. 220 pp. Cloth $45.00 (9781912339433)
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, July 6–December 1, 2019

In 2017, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art received a trove of 9,200 Polaroids taken by unknown artist April Dawn Alison (1941–2008). To use curator Erin O’Toole’s words, Alison was “the private feminine persona” of Alan Schaefer, a reclusive Oakland-based commercial photographer with a proclivity for short dresses, high heels, wigs, and jewelry, whose gender identity was known only to a few relatives and friends. The voluminous archive consists mostly of self-portraits taken in the... Full Review

March 13, 2020
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Meiqin Wang
Routledge Research in Art and Politics. New York: Routledge, 2019. 252 pp.; 16 color ills.; 58 b/w ills. Cloth $155.00 (9781138314344)

In the past few decades, the global contemporary art world has witnessed a significant revival of interest in the question of art’s social dimensions, including awareness of the public sphere, civic engagement, and participation in politics. This “social turn” has manifested as a critique of institutionalized postmodernism and neoliberal capitalism. The rise of socially engaged art in China has echoed this international art phenomenon. Artists, critics, and researchers are harnessing the... Full Review

March 11, 2020
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Gülru Çakmak
Liverpool, UK: Liverpool University Press, 2018. 256 pp.; 13 color ills.; 36 b/w ills. Cloth $120.00 (9781786940674)

Gülru Çakmak’s book on the French artist Jean-Léon Gérôme was a joy to read. It is the first monograph that I have read that engages seriously, thoroughly, and deeply with Gérôme’s academic paintings. It focuses on the artist’s most famous works from the 1850s, an early stage in what was to become a stellar career within the institutional framework of nineteenth-century Paris: Duel after the Masquerade (1857), Prayer in the House of an Arnaut Chief (1857), Ave Caesar!... Full Review

March 9, 2020
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Lamia Balafrej
Edinburgh Studies in Islamic Art. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019. 276 pp.; 74 color ills. Cloth $150.00 (9781474437431)

A stimulating read from start to finish, Lamia Balafrej’s The Making of the Artist in Late Timurid Painting is the first book-length analysis of one of the most important codices of Islamic art—the Cairo Bustan (The orchard). Currently preserved in Cairo, this fifteenth-century copy of Saʻdi’s (d. 1291) Persian book of poetry was produced in Herat (in today’s Afghanistan) for Husayn Bayqara (r. ca. 1470–1506), a ruler of the Timurid Empire, which dominated Central Asia... Full Review

March 6, 2020
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